Bright Spot: Vibia Illuminates a Historic London Townhouse

29th November, 2019

In a historic, four-level London townhouse, designer Staffan Tollgard had a mission: create a graceful, sophisticated space that feels vibrant and contemporary.

Vibia - The Edit - Link XXL - Windows of Light
Vibia - The Edit - Link XXL - Windows of Light

To help achieve this goal, Tollgard—of the award-winning London-based Tollgard Design Group—teamed up with Xavio lighting consultants to brighten the interiors.

Vibia - The Edit - Link XXL - Windows of Light

The home’s downstairs area offered a unique challenge because of its limited natural light. The solution? They selected Vibia’s Link XXL by Ramón Esteve for the 1970s-inspired sunken den. Mimicking the effect of a skylight, the modular fixture features three connected panels of different shapes and sizes.

Vibia - The Edit - Link XXL - Windows of Light

© Photography: Richard Gooding. Project: NV INTEGRATION

Vibia - The Edit - Link XXL - Windows of Light

© Photography: Richard Gooding. Project: NV INTEGRATION

Recalling an urban skyline, the crisp, cubic volumes create a customised ceiling silhouette that appears integrated into the architecture. Link’s unique geometric profile makes it appear as if the light is entering the interior at different heights, lending radiance and warmth.

Vibia - The Edit - Link XXL - Windows of Light

In the hallway adjacent to the den, the designers opted for a trio of LED-powered Centric ceiling lamps by Ramos & Bassols. Similar to Link XXL, Centric evokes a window channeling brightness from the outside.

Vibia - The Edit - Link XXL - Windows of Light

© Photography: Richard Gooding. Project: NV INTEGRATION

Vibia - The Edit - Link XXL - Windows of Light

© Photography: Richard Gooding. Project: NV INTEGRATION

Its distinctive design is composed of a pair of concentric spheres, a shape that accentuates the lighting source in the centre while casting a reflected glow from the periphery of the rings.
Centric’s circular silhouette also mirrors the gentle curve of the stairway and the wall’s pale color palette.